T&T

Belize Gay rights IN Cabinet gender policy; Trinidad Gay rights OUT

The moral direction of the country of Belize is now resting on the shoulders of one man. While the country awaits the Chief Justice’s decision in July on Belize’s sodomy laws, the Revised Gender policy 2013 has apparently jumped the gun. The spokesperson for the Women’s Commission, says the policy  includes sexual orientation because that is,  ” part of the gender equality mix. And they should not be discriminated against regardless of race, color, creed, political affiliation, or sex. And it’s part of the preamble of the policy and it’s in the constitution.” It may seem presumptuous that the policy has declared sexual orientation as covered by the constitution of Belize, especially since that is one of the points the chief justice has to be considering in making his decision. But even more fascinating, is the fact that this new policy has been stamped and approved by cabinet when government is currently fighting in the courts against the amendment to Belize’s sodomy laws. This appears to be a contradiction and members of the Christian community are now asking how such a policy could have been approved. In stark contrast to Belize’s handling T&Tof this new gender policy, Trinidad and Tobago took another approach by consulting with various religious organizations before approving the policy. According to Trinidad and Tobago’s Guardian, ” God still reigns supreme in T&T, according to the Constitution, and gay rights will not be a part of the Government’s draft national policy on gender and development .”  That was not for lack of trying on the part of those pushing the homosexual agenda but because the ministry held two consultations with the religious groups which flatly rejected any support for the legalization of homosexuality. The Minister said it took years for the gender policy to reach the level of Cabinet due to an effort to hear everyone’s views, including the church.

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